Tips for Running With Your Dog

Unless you happen to share your life with a born side runner (like Dalmatians, once bred to run alongside fire engines), you may have to teach your dog the human version of running. Dogs like to go faster than people, check out interesting smells along the route, and chase the occasional squirrel up a tree. 

Child – Dog Etiquette

The risk of being bitten by a dog is low compared to other common causes of accidents, in or out of the household, but that’s no consolation to those who find themselves on the business end of a pair of canine choppers. Kids especially are vulnerable.

Beyond Fetch: Games To Play With Your Dog

A game is a great way to exercise your dog’s body and mind, and spend a little quality time together. What’s in your repertoire? Here’s a selection of games you can play indoors or outside: Homegrown agility. If your house is big enough, create a makeshift obstacle course for your dog from rolled-up towels, cardboard… Read more »

Getting Real with Your Dog

One of the most frequent sources of frustration in dog training? Unrealistic expectations. Dogs’ intelligence shines through in so many ways that we tend to ascribe them decidedly human cognitive skills, such as the ability to understand complex sentences. It’s what some dog trainers refer to as “the Lassie syndrome.” If you often find yourself frustrated with your dog, here’s a primer on what it takes to create a Lassie:.

Sibling Rivalry

All dogs squabble occasionally. Dogs who live together mostly get into scraps over stuff they both want: Food, bones, toys, human attention, and sleeping spots. Like us, they have individual preferences and moods, and might be having a grumpy day or a headache. If the fights don’t result in injuries (i.e. you’re not at the… Read more »

Dogs & Sweaters

Is the doggie sweater (jacket, snowsuit, raincoat, etc.) really necessary? The answer boils down to what your dog is naturally equipped with, coat-wise. Double-coated dogs with high coat density like Akitas, Malamutes, and Siberian Huskies were bred for harsh conditions and are uncomfortable with outerwear of any kind. Double-coated dogs with lower coat density like… Read more »

Living with Dogs: Dig This

Why do dogs dig? Because it’s fun. Dogs love to bury or recover bones, dig out prey like mice and rats, or make a nice cooling pit when the weather is warm. Digging isn’t a behavior problem, it’s normal canine behavior and thoroughly enjoyable for the dog. But it can still be a problem for… Read more »

Water Work

The highest-performing dogs
in this sport are typically dogs bred for water work—Newfoundlands for water
rescue and Portuguese Water Dogs (PWDs) for working alongside fishermen. But
all water-loving dogs can participate at some level. Both water work
activities—rescue work and assisting fishing vessels—form the basis for a set
of water trials.

4 Tips for Successful Outings

​A successful outing with your dog is one that’s safe and enjoyable for both of you. As natural and easy as that sounds, it often doesn’t happen unless you prepare for and practice it. Here are some tips for making the most of your time out and about with Fido.

When Dogs Eat Greenery

It’s a rare dog that never partakes of a tender stalk of juicy grass—and some dogs practically graze. Dogs are omnivores and it’s likely their diet in the wild would include fruit, berries, seeds, herbs, and a variety of grasses (despite lacking the enzyme to digest grass). On occasion, grass-eating is an attempt to induce… Read more »

To Be Or Not To Be…A Dog’s Dog

Social dog We all want our dogs to play nice with other dogs—and shouldn’t it come naturally? Dogs are social, after all. So why does an otherwise sweet-natured canine buddy turn into a killjoy at the park? Well, dogs can be introverts, too. Like humans, they can have bad days and they occasionally form instant… Read more »

Let Sleeping Humans Lie…

Some dogs don’t appreciate a good lie-in—or know the difference between workdays and weekends. Young puppies and senior dogs can’t be expected it to hold it all night and are legitimately excused, but adult dogs should know better. If your dog has taken it upon himself to be your personal alarm clock, here are some tips.